Posts Tagged ‘BIxPress’

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BIxPress Now with SQL Server 2012 Support

May 30, 2012

Last week Pragmatic Works launched it’s latest version of BIxPress with some great new features.  At the top of that list of new features was adding support for SQL Server 2012 SSIS Packages.  The Auditing Framework, Notification Framework, and Snippets you’ve come to rely on in your 2008 and 2005 environments are now available in 2012. 

Once you’ve tried out the real time monitoring console from BIxPress, it will change the way you monitor packages in your SSIS environment forever. No longer do you have to watch your package in Debug Mode inside BIDS.  Neither do you have to wait for an error notification to be sent to you if a package fails.  You can view packages that have been deployed to your server as they are running, just as if you had opened them up in bids.

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You don’t have to worry about conflicts between some of the new features in 2012 and features in BIxPress, because they are either disabled or removed completely in this latest release of BIxPress. 

 

Check out all the new features of BIxPress here.

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Its 10 PM, Do You Know Where Your Configurations And Expressions In SSIS Are? BIxPress Does And It Will Tell You Too.

September 14, 2011

With some of the more complex SSIS packages that we develop the number of expressions we use as well as the number of package configurations can become quite large.  That can make remembering which component has an expression and what that expression is rather difficult, and the same goes for configurations too.  BIxPress has a couple of features that can really help you manage this quite easily.

The Expression Highlighter in BIxPress helps you visually identify which components have expressions and which connections have configurations. Here is how it works.  In this package the Data Flow Task currently has no expressions associated with it.

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Now I’ll quickly add an expression on the description of the data flow task

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Once that is complete and you hit OK the appearance of the Data Flow task has now changed slightly. There is now a little red circle on the Data Flow Task, which is how BIxPress identifies components with expressions associated with them.

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The process is pretty much the same for identifying package configurations.  Here are the before and after views of a connection manager with and without the package configuration.

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As you can see the package configuration shows up as a blue circle instead of a red.  Well what happens if you have an expression and a configuration on the same component?  Lets add a expression on the same connection manager we just added configurations to.

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The connection manager now looks like this.

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This will make identifying the components so much easier.  What if you don’t want to go through each component one at a time to see which expression each one has.  BIxPress has another feature that lets you see all of the expressions in a list, and not surprisingly its called the Expression List.  Here is how it works.

From the BIxPress menu select the Expression List and a new window will open up.

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As you can see this lists all the components that have expressions.  It gives you each object type, object name, the expression property, and the expression.  You also have the option to edit the expression right from this window using BIxPress’ Expression Editor as well.  With BIxPress knowing where your expressions are and what they are doing is much easier.

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Change Variable Scope with BIxPress

September 13, 2011

One of the biggest annoyances I have when building packages is creating variables in the wrong scope of the package, for instance needing the variable at the package level but mistakenly creating it in the data flow task.  Its not a huge deal to recreate it, but it can be time consuming if you created several variables in the wrong scope.  BIxPress makes it possible to actually change the scope of a variable with a few quick clicks.

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The highlighted variable is in the wrong scope, it should be in the package scope (LoopLoadArchive).  To change the scope using BIxPress simply click on the button to start the wizard.

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Here you must choose the variable you want to move, if you want to copy or move the variable, and finally what scope you want it moved to.

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Click on the green arrow pointing to the right and the variable will be moved.

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This has been a huge time saver for me on the times where I have had my head down for hours creating SSIS packages only to realized that I now have a dozen variables set to the wrong scope.  This is just one of many of the hidden advantages of developing SSIS packages with BIxPress.